Upcoming Events Upcoming Events available at pressroomnh.com http://pressroomnh.com/rss.cfm Tue, 31 Mar 2015 01:41:55 PST en-us Upcoming Events https://s3.amazonaws.com/webassets.ticketmob.com/TS/templates/images/logos/thepresslogo.png http://pressroomnh.com/rss.cfm Copyright 2015 pressroomnh.com http://pressroomnh.com/ <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 31 Mar 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185529 <![CDATA[Ten String Symphony]]> 10 String Symphony is an arena for mesmerizing acoustic innovation.  Although difficult to categorize, their music is instantly recognizable as a blend of two distinct but equally vivacious musical voices, encompassing “aggressive, almost discordant, celtic and dare I say punky string-chording experimentations” (The Bluegrass Situation).  Vocally, Rachel Baiman and Christian Sedelmyer lock in seamlessly, and their vocal duets often take center stage despite the fact that they are self-described fiddle players.

 Sedelmyer (Jerry Douglas Band ) and Baiman met in Nashville, and realized a mutual love for the range and depth of the 5-String fiddle.  Their desire to see just how far a two-fiddle, two-vocals instrumentation could take them was the inspiration for the 10 String Symphony project.  By the time their first full-length album was released in November 2012, their instrumentation had expanded to include the occasional clawhammer banjo and resonator mandolin, though still maintaining a stripped down, tightly woven and carefully arranged duo sound.

Decidedly contemporary in their musical approach, their debut album showcases Sedelmyer’s virtuosic improvisation and creative harmonic soundscape ideas alongside Baiman’s old-time rhythm and emotional melodic sensibilities. Only two years old as a band, the duo has already gained recognition and attention from some major festivals, landing slots at the ROMP festival in Owensboro, KY, the Strawberry Music Festival in Yosemite, CA, and a headlining slot at the 2014 Auckland Folk Festival in New Zealand.

When each song ended, the two pressed tight into their microphones, savoring the last strains of the harmony – and even the bartenders seemed to be leaning forward breathlessly, awaiting someone to clap first.  Their self titled recording aptly demonstrates the power of a spare, tightly-connected acoustic performance that is given room to evolve – for bluegrass fans, the lightning-fast harmonic runs on dueling fiddle is worth the price of admission alone. But it’s the off the road experiments, especially from Christian’s biting bow-strokes that will make future audiences take note.” 

 

                                                                                                                  

 

-Z. N. LUPETIN, The Bluegrass Situation                                                                                                                                                 

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Thu, 02 Apr 2015 09:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=186184
<![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 07 Apr 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185530 <![CDATA[The Portland Cello Project and The Ballroom Thieves]]> Since the group's inception in late 2007, the Portland Cello Project (or, PCP, as their fans affectionately call them), has wowed audiences all over the country with extravagant performances, everywhere from Prairie Home Companion, to parties on loading docks in NYC, to symphony halls from coast to coast, to punk rock clubs.. The group has built a reputation mixing genres and blurring musical lines and perceptions wherever they go.

No two shows are alike, with a repertoire now numbering over 1,000 pieces of music both expected and unexpected to come from a cello. The Cello Project's stage setup ranges from the very simple (4-6 cellos), to the all out epic (which has included 12 cellos playing with full choirs, winds, horns, and numerous percussion players).

The Cello Project works to build bridges across musical communities through collaborations and educational outreach. They have collaborated with a diverse assortment of musicians, from high school and university music programs, to the Dandy Warhols to Garrison Keillor to Trampled by Turtles to Corin Tucker to Maya Beiser to Ben Sollee to Zoe Keating to Howe Gelb, just to name a few...

The room is dark, as feet shuffle and people slowly mill about the open space in front of the barely-lit stage. The hiss as beer cans are cracked open mixes in with the swilling of whiskey and the dropping of ice in glasses and throwaway cups. It’s a lively, talkative crowd that starts moving closer and closer to the stage as the room lights dim and the stage lights come on. All of a sudden, the simple, lightly-strummed chords of “Coward’s Son” echo over that intimate room, and as Martin Earley’s vocals come into play, the melody continues to build, adding layer after layer. The low end of Calin Peters’ cello adds a haunting, echoing rhythm to the bright chime of Earley’s guitar part, while the accents of cymbal hits, djembe, and floor tom from Devin Mauch introduce the heartbeat of the group, their soaring three-part harmonies, with a bang. As the song grows, the band transforms from a folk three-piece in a small room into an arena-filling orchestra of soul, spilling their raw emotions into every microphone and corner. Audiotree said of the performance, “Three unique voices separate and intertwine to emit one call, channeling sounds from the Delta and bits of old Gospel guises and transcends this Boston trio’s urban roots.”

Truly a high-energy rock trio performing under the guise of well-crafted, emotionally sincere folk, the Thieves have released two well-received EPs since getting their start three years ago. With a strong presence in the Boston area and New England, they have received press from local blog luminaries such asAllston Pudding, who said of the Thieves live performance, “The intensity and passion The Ballroom Thieves had for the songs they delivered- it was hard to believe it was just three of them.” The Thieves have begun to branch out from New England, touring around the country with well-known stalwarts such as The Lone Bellow, Dispatch, Railroad Earth and Houndmouth, among others.

Their first EP, The Devil and the Deep, placed a heavy emphasis on experimentation and finding the identity of the band’s sound. Tracks range from uptempo rock beats (“Loose Lips,” “Vampires”), to slower, more soulful tunes (“Save Me,” “Delia”). “Wait for the Water” is is a homey, folk classic in the making, with a slow single-guitar buildup making way for a boot-stomping finale, complete with banjos and those trademark soaring three-part harmonies.

On their follow up, self-titled EP, the Thieves showcase a much more coherent sound, reflecting a much grittier, frenetic energy that could easily be mistaken for a whiskey-filled revival tent setting. The stomp of opening track, “Down By the River” reflects this intent to make a record that best captures their live performances. While “Armada” and “Droves” still reflect this intent, the slower dynamic of “Coward’s Son” provides a haunting contrast to the other three swampier, low-end-driven drinking songs. With deeply personal lyrics and a gradual, lit-fuse-like build, Earley showcases his ability to work in the context of an established genre and make it his own. The sound of the Thieves is one of an impassioned brand of folk music that combines deft instrumentation and expressive lyricism with an emotionality that seems to be missing in lots of folk music today. In a recent interview with Grateful Web, the Thieves said of their new EP, “we made a conscious choice of including songs that hit hard. We think our show is a lively mix of upbeat songs and slower, more introspective tunes, so these four songs are meant to give the listener a good idea of what to expect when he or she makes it to a Ballroom Thieves show.”


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Sat, 11 Apr 2015 07:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=186354
<![CDATA[The Portland Cello Project and The Ballroom Thieves]]> Since the group's inception in late 2007, the Portland Cello Project (or, PCP, as their fans affectionately call them), has wowed audiences all over the country with extravagant performances, everywhere from Prairie Home Companion, to parties on loading docks in NYC, to symphony halls from coast to coast, to punk rock clubs.. The group has built a reputation mixing genres and blurring musical lines and perceptions wherever they go.

No two shows are alike, with a repertoire now numbering over 1,000 pieces of music both expected and unexpected to come from a cello. The Cello Project's stage setup ranges from the very simple (4-6 cellos), to the all out epic (which has included 12 cellos playing with full choirs, winds, horns, and numerous percussion players).

The Cello Project works to build bridges across musical communities through collaborations and educational outreach. They have collaborated with a diverse assortment of musicians, from high school and university music programs, to the Dandy Warhols to Garrison Keillor to Trampled by Turtles to Corin Tucker to Maya Beiser to Ben Sollee to Zoe Keating to Howe Gelb, just to name a few...

The room is dark, as feet shuffle and people slowly mill about the open space in front of the barely-lit stage. The hiss as beer cans are cracked open mixes in with the swilling of whiskey and the dropping of ice in glasses and throwaway cups. It’s a lively, talkative crowd that starts moving closer and closer to the stage as the room lights dim and the stage lights come on. All of a sudden, the simple, lightly-strummed chords of “Coward’s Son” echo over that intimate room, and as Martin Earley’s vocals come into play, the melody continues to build, adding layer after layer. The low end of Calin Peters’ cello adds a haunting, echoing rhythm to the bright chime of Earley’s guitar part, while the accents of cymbal hits, djembe, and floor tom from Devin Mauch introduce the heartbeat of the group, their soaring three-part harmonies, with a bang. As the song grows, the band transforms from a folk three-piece in a small room into an arena-filling orchestra of soul, spilling their raw emotions into every microphone and corner. Audiotree said of the performance, “Three unique voices separate and intertwine to emit one call, channeling sounds from the Delta and bits of old Gospel guises and transcends this Boston trio’s urban roots.”

Truly a high-energy rock trio performing under the guise of well-crafted, emotionally sincere folk, the Thieves have released two well-received EPs since getting their start three years ago. With a strong presence in the Boston area and New England, they have received press from local blog luminaries such asAllston Pudding, who said of the Thieves live performance, “The intensity and passion The Ballroom Thieves had for the songs they delivered- it was hard to believe it was just three of them.” The Thieves have begun to branch out from New England, touring around the country with well-known stalwarts such as The Lone Bellow, Dispatch, Railroad Earth and Houndmouth, among others.

Their first EP, The Devil and the Deep, placed a heavy emphasis on experimentation and finding the identity of the band’s sound. Tracks range from uptempo rock beats (“Loose Lips,” “Vampires”), to slower, more soulful tunes (“Save Me,” “Delia”). “Wait for the Water” is is a homey, folk classic in the making, with a slow single-guitar buildup making way for a boot-stomping finale, complete with banjos and those trademark soaring three-part harmonies.

On their follow up, self-titled EP, the Thieves showcase a much more coherent sound, reflecting a much grittier, frenetic energy that could easily be mistaken for a whiskey-filled revival tent setting. The stomp of opening track, “Down By the River” reflects this intent to make a record that best captures their live performances. While “Armada” and “Droves” still reflect this intent, the slower dynamic of “Coward’s Son” provides a haunting contrast to the other three swampier, low-end-driven drinking songs. With deeply personal lyrics and a gradual, lit-fuse-like build, Earley showcases his ability to work in the context of an established genre and make it his own. The sound of the Thieves is one of an impassioned brand of folk music that combines deft instrumentation and expressive lyricism with an emotionality that seems to be missing in lots of folk music today. In a recent interview with Grateful Web, the Thieves said of their new EP, “we made a conscious choice of including songs that hit hard. We think our show is a lively mix of upbeat songs and slower, more introspective tunes, so these four songs are meant to give the listener a good idea of what to expect when he or she makes it to a Ballroom Thieves show.”


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Sat, 11 Apr 2015 09:30:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=186355
<![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 14 Apr 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185531 <![CDATA[Caroline Rose]]> Sometimes epic failures produce epic results. With the release of her new album I Will Not Be Afraid, keen-eyed young singer-songwriter Caroline Rose has broken her long string of short-circuits with a live-wire national debut that draws on her roots in rockabilly, vintage country and blues to capture her unique and personal vision.

Hoping to escape the dead ends that befell her hometown, colloquially dubbed a stop on “heroin highway”, Rose found her way out via a full ride to a small liberal arts college, where she failed as a scholar, barely scraping by to graduation. Next came a stint as a failed hippie, working on and leaving an organic farm. She then bought a vintage sports car to travel the country, but it quickly broke down. On the plus side, Rose got a job at a cider distillery, where she got to taste apple brandy and applejack all day…Followed by a stint stocking shelves and sweeping floors at a grocery store for a boss who eventually fired her.

“That was the last straw,” Rose recounts. “I don’t like most bosses and most bosses don’t like me. I don’t like most professors and most professors don’t like me. So here I am. I’ve made my own way on my own terms and it’s destiny knocking on my door. BAM!”

She describes the 11 songs on I Will Not Be Afraid as “postcards I’ve picked up from along the road,” and she means that literally. Rose is in perpetual motion. She tours and lives in her van, traveling the highways and back roads to fuel her creative spirit.

Rose’s wanderlust has taken the 24-year-old from her birthplace in a not-so-idyllic small Northeastern town to every corner of the nation, where she’s made friendships, heard stories and had experiences that she’s fashioned into songs like “America Religious,” which uses a driving snare drum with brushes and psychedelic folk fiddle to underpin the cool waterfall of her peaches and molasses voice as she sings about the open skies and the storm clouds inside the American heart. And in her own.

The themes of some of Rose’s songs are drawn from the familiar. “Blood On Your Bootheels,” which opens I Will Not Be Afraid with her prickly guitar and crazy-carnival organ, was inspired by the Trayvon Martin slaying and Rose’s own passionate reaction to violence and intolerance. “Everyone seems to have their opinions about how to live free in this country, especially when it comes to young men and even more especially when it comes to young black men like Trayvon,” Rose observes. Injustice and hardship also underline “Tightrope Walker,” a song inspired by a friend’s stories about working in the school system of an impoverished Mississippi town.

But other songs literally haunt her dreams. The gorgeous textural arrangement and lyrics of “When You Go” — which evoke the openness of both the Southwest and of the future in Rose’s and co-producer Jer Coons’ shimmering guitars and her strong, defiant vocal performance — tumbled out during a night’s rest. “Sometimes songs come to me while I’m asleep and they wake me up, and that’s the best time for me to write,” Rose relates. “When I wake up my mind is like a clear glass of water. I can see everything and capture it.” That’s especially apt for the stream of consciousness lyrics that bring many of her numbers to life.

Rose’s own life seems more akin to Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. Growing up in a coastal town, her parents — who were visual artists with a love for travel — gave Rose a restless, creative spirit. And like many working class seaside locales, her hometown suffers epidemic heroin abuse.

“I saw a lot of my friends get consumed by it, but I was one of the people that got out,” Rose says. “I worked my ass off to go to college and that really was my only plan of escape at that point. I think I was in denial about being an artist.”

For two of those years Rose worked on the aforementioned farm, hoping the experience would provide her with balance and direction. “I liked the work, but I’m too city to be country and too country to be city,” she offers. “So I moved on.” When Rose worked at a cider distillery, she slept in the barn loft where she recorded many of the demos for I Will Not Be Afraid with her acoustic guitar.

“I finally accepted the idea that writing, singing and playing songs is the only thing I’ve ever really been good at,” Rose relates, “so I decided to forget about everything else and live in my car, and I hit the road.”

Rose joined a new generation of touring songwriters who blend tradition, innovation and edginess, like Hayes Carll, whom she opened for in 2014 and bandmember Jer Coons, whom Rose shared a bill with one night and discovered to be a kindred spirit. Rose produced I Will Not Be Afraid with co-production by Coons at his Burlington, Vermont studio, where they also made Rose’s 2013 self-released America Religious, playing all the guitars, keyboards, harmonica, mandolin, drums and percussion themselves.

Rose explains that the title track is her mantra. “So many people are held back by fear,” she says. “They wish they could do something else with their lives, and they just can’t take the first step. I grew up questioning everything and learned that I needed to be on my own. I needed freedom and I needed to create on my own terms and to keep moving forward without fear, wherever I go.

“I also came to understand that I don’t have any choice,” she continues. “Music is what keeps me breathing. I can’t do anything else.” 

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Thu, 16 Apr 2015 09:30:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=194303
<![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 21 Apr 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185532 <![CDATA[Landlady]]> "This is the part of the song when we come together." Adam Schatz's voice rings out in the flickering candlelight of Manhattan Inn. Last summer, he began a monthly series in the Greenpoint bar's piano-anchored back room, built to bring his friends together to play music. And Schatz – who plays in Man Man and Father Figures, co-produces NYC Winter Jazzfest, founded Search & Restore, and has wielded his saxophone on numerous stages and on recordings for bands like Vampire Weekend (see "Diane Young") and Those Darlins – has a lot of friends. But on this warm summer night, the man that energizes so many NYC scenes stood on a piano bench, gazing somewhere only he could see, and declared a scene of his own: "There's no before. There's no after. There's only this." This is Landlady.

The song was "Above My Ground," a disarming sing-along anthem and a wide window into Schatz – the songwriter, the multi-instrumentalist, the vocalist. Over the past three years, Landlady has evolved alongside its busy leader, self-releasing Keeping To Yourself in 2011, solidifying into a striking five-member lineup that includes Mikey Freedom Hart, Ian Chang, Ian Davis, and Booker Stardrum, and recording Upright Behavior. The new album will be released July 15, 2014 on Hometapes (home to Bear In Heaven, Celestial Shore, Megafaun, Leverage Models, Brad Laner, Pattern Is Movement, and more).

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Sat, 25 Apr 2015 10:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=195171
<![CDATA[ISKA DHAAF]]> Iska Dhaaf (taken from Somali, translated roughly to “let it go”)

Inspired by Sufipoetry, limitation, andan obsessive preoccupation with writing, Nathan Quiroga and Benjamin Verdoes have fused their seemingly disparate musical and personal backgrounds into something searching and honest. Their songs, with heavy rhythms and cutting melodic hooks, are at once infectious and sweetly disarming  ]]>
Sun, 26 Apr 2015 09:30:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=193000
<![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 28 Apr 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185533 <![CDATA[Delicate Steve with special guest Nat Baldwin]]> Thu, 30 Apr 2015 09:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=191881 <![CDATA[Fishbone]]>

Celebrating 25 groundbreaking years, Fishbone has been trailblazing their way through the history of American Ska, Funk, Punk, Rock Fusion and (so-called) Black Rock since starting their professional career in Los Angeles’ burgeoning, Alternative Rock music scene of the mid-1980s. Their sound has often been imitated, but never duplicated. They have toured worldwide with such bands as the Beastie Boys, Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Roots, Les Claypool/Primus, Fela Kuti, George Clinton, The Dead Kennedys and many more. Angelo Moore’s ability to combine thought-provoking, humorous social commentary with FISHBONE’s frenzied, up-tempo music and frantic, euphorically entertaining stage show has cultivated their undisputed reputation as one of the best live acts in music history.

Now reaching beyond their 25th year of composing, creating, recording, releasing and performing original music together, mass critical appeal appears to be returning to the band, fueled by their critically acclaimed full-length feature documentary; Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone. Narrated by Laurence Fishburne, the film earned LA Weekly’s Critic’s Choice Award at the Los Angeles Film Fest in 2010, has been called “effortlessly Entertaining” (Variety), “Brilliant and Groundbreaking” (Pop Matters), and hailed as “more than a documentary about rock ‘n’ roll. It’s a documentary about the American spirit and one that shows the life of one of its most influential creative forces.” (Encore Magazine)

The documentary features celebrity testimonials from an A-list cast of rock icons such as Flea (Red Hot Chili Peppers), who calls the band “an important musical institution” and “the band that gave us the inspiration to be a band” by Gwen Stefani (No Doubt). The film also includes similar admiration from the likes of Perry Farrell (Jane’s Addiction), Jerry Cantrell (Alice In Chains) Rob Trujillo (Metallica), Questlove (The Roots), Chuck D (Public Enemy), Tim Robbins (Grammy Winning Actor) and many more. The film not only highlights the bands substantial legacy in contemporary music of all forms, but also the struggles, adversity, and inner turmoil that has surrounded the bands career. Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone has already premiered in over 60+ theaters across the country, and many of the dates have sold out. The documentary aired on Public Television’s AfroPop Series as well as Encore early 2012, and still continues on air. The DVD is currently available for purchase nationwide at all major retailers, and on Netflix.

To date, FISHBONE still continues to tour all over the world, turning heads at some of the most noteworthy festivals around the globe such as Gathering of the Vibes in Bridgeport, CT (2013), Outside Lands Music Festival in San Francisco, CA (2013), Ottawa Blues Fest (2012), Montreal Jazz Festival (2012), DeLuna Fest in Pensacola, FL (2012), Bumbershoot in Seattle, WA (2012), Riot Fest in Chicago, IL (2012), Voodoo Festival in New Orleans, LA (2011), Fuji Rock Festival in Tokyo, Japan (2010), Wakarusa in Ozark, AK (2010), Sunset Junction in Los Angeles, CA (2010) and more. In 2012, The band had the opportunity to perform on Jimmy Kimmel Live! and Angelo Moore sat in with The Roots on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.

They also performed three outstanding shows with Primus, and have been recently featured in a variety of national press recently including New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, MTV Hive, Spin Magazine, E! Entertainment, Rotten Tomatoes and more.

In addition, FISHBONE completed a national U.S. tour with Slightly Stoopid and Dumpstaphunk; a sold-out SXSW showcase with Wu-Tang Clan and Mobb Deep; an Australian tour featuring performances with Trombone Shorty and George Clinton, highlighted by a performance at Byron Bay Blues Festival in 2011.

The band released a single “Whipper Snapper” in March 2013, on a 7-inch split record with Slightly Stoopid. Their latest Crazy Glue (DC-Jam Records) released October 11, 2011 and is currently available online everywhere and select retail stores nationwide. The band has plans to release a new EP in 2014.

The current member lineup includes original members Angelo Moore aka Dr. Madd Vibe (vocals/sax/theramin), Norwood Fisher (bass/vocals), Dirty Walt (trumpet, vocals), as well as Rocky George (guitar), Paul Hampton (keyboards/vocals), John Steward (drums), and Jay Armant (trombone, vocals).

 

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Mon, 04 May 2015 09:30:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=195173
<![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 05 May 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185534 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 12 May 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185535 <![CDATA[Lady Lamb with Rathbone]]> To many, Lady Lamb is an enigma. Her songs are at once intimate and unbridled– both deeply personal and existentially contemplative. Aly Spaltro is a fearless performer who can command a pitch black stage with nothing more than her voice. Yet, when the band bursts in and the lights come up, what began as a demonstration of restraint shifts seamlessly into an emphatic snarl. On her newest work, After, Spaltro explores dualities further – giving equal attention to both the internal and external, the before and after. Her most palpable fears and memories are on display here, with a familiar vulnerability even more direct than her last effort. After boasts driving rhythms, bold melodies, candid lyricism, and a growling sonic stamp that is all her own.

Spaltro’s formative years were full of change – moving houses, cities, and countries every three years until she landed in her family’s home state of Maine. It was here that Spaltro found her voice among thousands of films at Bart & Greg’s DVD Explosion, an independent rental store in the small coastal town of Brunswick. During the day Spaltro would rent movies to the locals. At night she would lock up, pull out her 8-track recorder, and create songs completely uninhibited by musical conventions, learning to play and sing as she hit record. These creations brought forth nearly one hundred recordings, twelve of which were carefully curated and fully realized on her 2013 full-length studio debut Ripely Pine (released on Ba Da Bing! Records). Ripely Pine garnered praise for its lyrical intricacies, emotive vocals, and often unpredictable musicality, introducing Spaltro as a formidable new artist.

In between tours, Spaltro returned home, focusing with laser-like intent on writing, arranging, and demoing the songs on After. These new works – which found Spaltro co-producing with her Ripely Pine partner Nadim Issa at his Brooklyn studio, Let ‘Em In – are sonically vibrant, with an assertive use of grit and brightness. Thematically, they provide direct insight into Spaltro’s rumination on mortality, family, friendships, and leaving home.

There are many songs on After that explore themes of a much larger scale. In “Heretic” Spaltro sings of a childhood UFO sighting in Arizona. In “Batter” she dies in a plane crash, while in “Spat Out Spit” she questions whether she was even born at all. Alternatively, in “Billions of Eyes” Spaltro can “only see into her suitcase,” her mind simultaneously present and wandering as she “gnaws [her] way back home.” The tender and sparse “Ten” delves into her mother’s childhood diary, giving the listener a clear view throughout into some of Spaltro’s warmest memories of her loved ones. Ripely Pine was marked by an undeniable passion and confidence, but where it sometimes lacked in personal narrative and directness is where After shines. The last line on After encompasses the self-assurance of the work as a whole, stating “I know where I come from.” This theme is a constant throughout After, as Spaltro seeks to allow the listener to move in closer than ever before, to reflect on the past with grace, and envision the future with fervor. Spaltro invites us to contemplate the dualities that make us human, encouraging the celebration of both fear and love: internally and externally, before and after.

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Wed, 13 May 2015 09:30:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=191034
<![CDATA[The New Mastersounds with Euforquestra]]>

The New Mastersounds formed in Leeds UK in 1999 and cut their teeth as the resident live band at a hip dance club, playing every Friday and Saturday night for nearly two years.

A rough 8-track recording of an early rehearsal got into the hands of some London DJs, and was released soon after on two limited-edition 7” singles. Invitations to play club gigs in London soon followed, and before long the band had established a reputation around UK and Europe as forerunners of the deep funk revival scene. Fast-forward to 2004: having experimented with various line-ups and recorded 2 albums, the original 4-piece band was invited to Chicago to open for the Greyboy All Stars at the House of Blues. This gig kicked off a prolific live career in USA which continues to the present day, backed up by more studio records, live albums, a remix album and 2 compilations. Their quirky, catchy instrumental ditties have been used on TV and film soundtracks, and the band is the subject of an award-winning feature-length documentary: “Coals to Newcastle: The New Mastersounds – from Leeds to New Orleans”.

Over the years they have collaborated or jammed with an impressive array of musicians DJs and producers, including: Lou Donaldson (Blue Note), Corinne Bailey Rae (EMI), Quantic (Tru Thoughts), Carleen Anderson (Young Disciples / Brand New Heavies), Keb Darge & Kenny Dope (Kay Dee Records), John Arnold (Ubiquity), Mr Scruff (Ninja Tune), Snowboy (Ubiquity), Fred Everything (2020vision), Andy Smith (Portishead), James Taylor (JTQ), LSK (Faithless), Lack of Afro (Freestyle), Page McConnell (Phish), Karl Denson (Lenny Kravitz / Greyboy AllStars), Melvin Sparks (Blue Note Records), George Porter Jr (The Meters), Fred Wesley, Maceo Parker (JB’s), and Art Neville (Neville Brothers, The Meters).

The band tours in support of the latest studio record, “Therapy”, released Spring 2014.

 
 
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Mon, 18 May 2015 09:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=198861
<![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 19 May 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185536 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 26 May 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185537 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 02 Jun 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185538 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 09 Jun 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185539 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 16 Jun 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185540 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 23 Jun 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185541 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 30 Jun 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185542 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 07 Jul 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185543 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 14 Jul 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185544 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 21 Jul 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185545 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 28 Jul 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185546 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 04 Aug 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185547 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 11 Aug 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185548 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 18 Aug 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185549 <![CDATA[The Jazz Jam///Hoot]]> Tue, 25 Aug 2015 06:00:00 PST http://pressroomnh.com/event.cfm?id=185550